Materiales de Construcción, Vol 52, No 266 (2002)

Novelda Stone: widely used within the Spanish architectural heritage


https://doi.org/10.3989/mc.2002.v52.i266.332

R. Fort
Instituto de Geología Económica. (CSIC-UCM). Facultad de Ciencias Geológicas, Laboratorio de Petrología Aplicada. Unidad Asociada Univ. de Alicante (CSIC), Spain

A. Bernabeu
Laboratorio de Petrología Aplicada. Unidad Asociada Univ. de Alicante (CSIC), Dep. de Ciencias de la Tierra. Univ. de Alicante, Spain

M. A. García del Cura
Instituto de Geología Económica. (CSIC-UCM). Facultad de Ciencias Geológicas, Laboratorio de Petrología Aplicada. Unidad Asociada Univ. de Alicante (CSIC), Spain

M. C. López de Azcona
Instituto de Geología Económica. (CSIC-UCM). Facultad de Ciencias Geológicas, Laboratorio de Petrología Aplicada. Unidad Asociada Univ. de Alicante (CSIC), Spain

S. Ordóñez
Laboratorio de Petrología Aplicada. Unidad Asociada Univ. de Alicante (CSIC), Dep. de Ciencias de la Tierra. Univ. de Alicante, Spain

F. Mingarro
Instituto de Geología Económica. (CSIC-UCM). Facultad de Ciencias Geológicas, Dep. de Petrología y Geoquímica. Facultad de Ciencias Geológicas. Univ. Complutense de Madrid, Spain

Abstract


Novelda Stone is a calcareous rock, of the biocalcarenite type. It is extracted from the «Vinalopó Medio» area (Alicante, eastern Spain). Novelda stone is known as construction material from the 13th century. From final of the 19th century until the present time, it has been used in Madrid, Valencia and Alicante. In the past, the main quarries from which this type of rock was extracted were located in the municipal districts of Monóvar (Almorquí Stone), Sax (Portazgo Stone) and Elda (Bateig Stone). Nowadays, the main active extraction site is situated in the Bateig Hill quarries. The rock extracted is known commercially as Bateig Stone. The main varieties of this Bateig Stone are: White, Blue, Layer and Fantasy.
Each variety of Novelda stone has different durability rate and different pathology depending on their characteristics, particularly on their hydric behaviour patterns. Layer Bateig and Portazgo stone undergo granular disintegration and alveolization and are less durable than the rest. White and Blue Bateig, as well as Almorquí stone, only develop fissures or scaling under extreme conditions.

Keywords


petrophysics; durability; building stone; porous stone; architectural heritage

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