Materiales de Construcción, Vol 51, No 262 (2001)

The Civil Palaces in Gravina street, Alicante: building stones and salt weathering


https://doi.org/10.3989/mc.2001.v51.i262.369

M. Louis
Dpto. de Construcciones Arquitectónicas. Univ. de Alicante, Laboratorio de Petrología Aplicada, Unidad Asociada UA-CSIC, Spain

M. A. García del Cura
Inst° de Geología Económica CSIC-UCM, Laboratorio de Petrología Aplicada, Unidad Asociada UA-CSIC, Spain

Y. Spairani
Dpto. de Construcciones Arquitectónicas. Univ. de Alicante, Spain

D. de Blas
Dpto. de Construcciones Arquitectónicas. Univ. de Alicante, Spain

Abstract


This paper presents a study into the architecture and construction of the 18th Century Civil Palaces located in Gravina street (Provincial Museum of Fine Arts of Alicante), the building stones used and the mineral related decay processes that these materials have suffered.
The original building stones and other stones used in subsequent restorations in these Civil Palaces are bioclastic limestones and/or calcarenites (San Julian Stone and Bateig Stone). Campello stone and other limestones are also present.
Granular disintegration and alveolar weathering are the main forms of deterioration developed on the exterior of these Civil Palaces. These stone decay types are related to salt crystallisation, caused by sea spray salts and/or soil capillary waters. Halite is the most common salt found, probably due to the buildings' proximity to the coast.
The halite is also present in indoor efflorescences. Gypsum is present in some efflorescences and ettringite on the inner face of the outdoor cladding stone. The cladding has been destroyed and replaced in the last restoration process.

Full Text:


PDF


Copyright (c) 2001 Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (CSIC)

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.


Contact us materconstrucc@ietcc.csic.es

Technical support soporte.tecnico.revistas@csic.es