Materiales de Construcción, Vol 51, No 263-264 (2001)

Role of clay constituents in stone decay processes


https://doi.org/10.3989/mc.2001.v51.i263-264.362

F. Veniale
Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra. Univ. de Pavía, Lab. for Clay Research and Archaeometry, Italy

M. Setti
The Getty Conservation Institute, Los Angeles (EE UU); Dep. de Mineralogía y Petrología. Univ. de Granada, United States

C. Rodríguez-Navarro
The Getty Conservation Institute, Los Angeles (EE UU); Dep. de Mineralogía y Petrología. Univ. de Granada, United States

S. Lodola
Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra. Univ. de Pavía, Lab. for Clay Research and Archaeometry, Italy

Abstract


Stone alterability/durability is depending upon a number of intrinsic and extrinsic factors among which "clay minerals" constituents, either diffused throughout the stone framework or as coating-filling of void spaces, can play an important role.
Swelling-shrinking and aggregation-disaggregation phenomena occurring by interaction of argillaceous particles with water and other fluids can cause destructuration of the stone resulting in a variety of pathologies. Also salt crystallization which is depending on fluid transfer, moisture evaporation and ion concentration in the circulating solutions, can be influenced by clay mineral reactivity. Furthermore, saline solutions can drastically change the clay minerals behaviour, resulting in enhanced "osmotic" swelling and variations in clay aggregation geometry; these phenomena resulting in significant stone damage.
Case histories concerning several lithotypes used for monumental buildings and artistic manufacts are reported for showing the role of different clay mineral types in determining trend and intensity of decay processes.

Full Text:


PDF


Copyright (c) 2001 Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (CSIC)

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.


Contact us materconstrucc@ietcc.csic.es

Technical support soporte.tecnico.revistas@csic.es